Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center

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Information about project titled 'Can training load management decrease injury and illness risk in elite youth-football?'

Can training load management decrease injury and illness risk in elite youth-football?

Details about the project - category Details about the project - value
Project status: Ongoing
Project manager: Torstein Dalen
Supervisor(s): Thor Einar Andersen, Ben Clarsen, John Bjørneboe
Coworker(s): Markus Vagle, Kevin Nordanger Martin, Michael Kleppen, Joar Harøy

Description

Background: Previous studies have revealed similar injury and illness problems in elite youth football when compared to professional football. Rapid change in training load (TL) is known to increase risk of injury and illness in a number of sports. Youth footballers does typically participate in training for different teams and will often have training at their high schools. This makes load monitoring and management difficult for the trainers. A solution to this problem could be a load management system for trainers.


Aim:
To investigate whether a load management system can reduce prevalence of injury and illness in elite youth-footballers.


Methods:
Ca. 30 teams will be included in this cluster-randomized controlled trial. The teams will be in the "junior"-category (15- to 19-years) and an equal amount of each gender will included. The intervention group will have their TL controlled by their trainer via a load management system. The control group will conduct planning and training as normal. Both groups will report their training load using the session Rating of Perceived Exertion-method daily, and report their prevalence of health problems through the "Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Overuse Questionnaire on Health Problems" each week.


Implications:
This study will be the first experimental study to investigate the effect of individual load management on health problem prevalence, and can potentially have a great influence on the direction in this field of research.